Another adventure!

What’s in the box?!

As most of you know, I’m a full-time Speech-Language Pathologist in a school system. I love my job and I also love the flexibility that my career field offers. I can work in school systems, private practice, nursing homes, hospitals, NICU, etc.. It’s the perfect career for a military spouse since we have to pick up and move every couple of years. I love all of the experiences that I’ve been afforded. During this season of our life, the school system has been perfect considering the ages of our children. I’ve been able to take them to school with me and share in those experiences, as well as, be on the same schedule as them through two deployments. As we look ahead to another move, we’ll have to decide what’s best for the next stage. Only time will tell! LOL!

I also began a venture into health coaching a couple of years ago. I was working on my own health/fitness and figured out that the best accountability was to help others as well. It’s been so rewarding and the benefits have carried over to all aspects of my life…parenting, marriage, vision for the future, goal setting, embracing the positives and striving to live each day to the fullest. Being a part of an amazing team has pushed me to step outside of my comfort zone and strive to become a better wife and mother.

I used to work in a hospital in the NICU and outpatient pediatrics. Many people aren’t aware that a part of Speech Pathologist’s scope of practice is feeding/swallowing. I loved that environment. I was constantly challenged and constantly learning in the medical environment. Since having my own children and dealing with bottles, pacifiers, sippy cups, spoon feeding, picky eating, etc., I’ve been wanting to get back into the area of pediatric feeding. I plan to pursue this when we find out our next location.

About a year ago after my experience with coaching and improving my own nutrition, I found myself wanting to learn more. I love being an accountability partner, but I wanted to have more knowledge in the area to serve others the best that I can. I am a firm believer that good nutrition can be the starting point to improving any aspect of life. I also believe that teaching our children good eating habits is crucial. The obesity rate is astronomical in our country. There are so many busy families out there and often quick/convenient food takes priority over nutritious. I want to help families come up with plans to incorporate healthier habits.

I’ve decided to take courses to become certified as a Nutrition and Wellness Consultant and Youth Nutrition Specialist. It’s been something that was weighing on my mind for awhile and I decided that this was the right time to go for it. I feel that the knowledge will help me both in the area of pediatric feeding and coaching. I’m looking forward to the challenge and I look forward to helping others lead healthier lives!

So what’s in the box?! TEXTBOOKS!

Here’s to another adventure!!23E427CE-F1D0-431D-A50D-CC18FC7E2604.jpeg

Storytime!

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I love that no matter how crazy or long a day may be, we always end up here. We have ended our days like this since Brayden was a baby. I love this time not only as a mom, but as an SLP. I remember doing research for my thesis in grad school about early literacy skills. The main focus was how important experiences like these are and how parents can implement strategies to help their children to become readers. Although I loved the research that I did back then, it sure is a whole lot more fun to apply the strategies to your own children! It’s even more fun when your kindergartener can read the bedtime stories!

Here are a couple of strategies that you can use during story time

  1. Focus on the letters and letter sounds.  Point out the fact that “cat” rhymes with “hat”.  Ask your child what sound the letter “S” makes.  Show them that the word “dog” has a letter “d” at the beginning.  Building that knowledge of letter-sound correspondence helps immensely with their early literacy skills.
  2. Track the print while you’re reading the words.  Your child will start to see and recognize words, letters and sounds as you read and incorporate some print referencing strategies.
  3. Ask questions.  Make story time a time of conversation.  Ask them what they think might happen next in the story.  Ask them what they would do if they were the character.  Ask them what is happening in the pictures.  Storytime is a perfect time to build language skills.
  4. When reading a book that has repetition like “Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See.”, encourage the child to help you “read” along and finish the phrases that they already know in the story.  Not only will this help them to recognize words, but it will build their confidence and encourage them to start trying to read on their own.What’s your favorite book at storytime?